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Gemini Melbourne


Melbourne’s Festival for Space

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Gemini Melbourne


Melbourne’s Festival for Space

2018 is the year for Australia in space. We have a new space agency, investors are pumping money into our home-grown space entrepreneurs, and today, we're looking to help you get a taste of Australia's rediscovered love for the cosmos.

On October 20 - 21, we will be running a two-day mini festival for space at the new Victorian Innovation Hub to celebrate Australia's renewed interest in the space industry.

The weekend will feature 3 main events:

  • NASA Space Apps Challenge and Moonshot’s T Minus Bootcamp

  • Melbourne Space Industry Mixer - a chance for industry representatives to network over drinks and canapés

  • Public events such as live interviews with space community leaders from around the globe, and a chance to test Opaque Space’s astronaut simulation virtual reality experiences

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What is the NASA Space Apps Challenge?

Moonshot and NASA are on a mission to foster innovation around challenges affecting us at home and in space. Space Apps is an annual hackathon that pulls citizens together regardless of their background or skill level. Don't let the name fool you... it's not just about apps!

For almost 48 hours, problem solvers from all over the world will participate in one of the largest hackathons in the universe. Students, experts, engineers, makers, artists, storytellers - Space Apps is for everyone! 

In Melbourne, Moonshot is encouraging people to also participate in the T Minus Bootcamp, where we want to help you test your solution in the real world. We provide additional challenges for hackathon participants and will be hosting workshops and discussions with experts on topics from where commercial space opportunities are to how to use the art of storytelling to sell your proposal. Who knows, maybe your idea will become a real space business!

Tackle a challenge using robotics, data visualization, hardware, design and many other specialties. Inspire each other while you learn and create using stories, code, design and, most of all, YOUR ideas. Show us your problem-solving skills and share your talents with the world.

We welcome ALL passionate problem solvers to join our community of innovators. Participants from across the globe have already created thousands of open-source solutions together through code, data visualizations, hardware and design. 

Join us on October 20-21st 2018 to be a part of creating the next generation of space technology!

Use the hashtags #OzSpace #moonshot and #SpaceApps on social media!

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Pick Your Challenge


Pick Your Challenge


The NASA Space Apps 2018 challenges can be found here.

At Moonshot, we have a broad view on what space tech really is. We believe that space is not just about rockets and satellites, and that it is a symbol of humankind’s ongoing journey to search for and create a more utopic future.

We split space technology into three areas. See the descriptions below to understand these further, and to see our example challenges. Keep in mind, you’re free to propose your own challenge for the competition!

Upstream Space Technology

This category is for technology, products and services that enables us to design, build and deploy space infrastructure. Solutions in this category are generally things most people wouldn’t consider to be space technology, and aren’t particularly high-tech either, but nonetheless they are critical the supporting space infrastructure.

  Space Law Services   Surprise! Space law is a thing. Almost every nation features complex regulation around near-space and outer space, generally deriving from international treaties such as the Outer Space Treaty.  While space is becoming more accessible for the every day person to take advantage of, meeting the requirements of local and international regulation is onerous and frequently the largest blockade for commercial space ventures taking off.  We challenge engineers and lawyers to join forces to develop automated legal services that reduce the friction experienced by novel space-related teams, while helping government protect their interests when ratifying space-related law.  HINT: Look into the  Space Activities Act 1998 (Cth.) ,  Defence Trade Controls Act 2012 (Cth.) ,  Radiocommunication Act 1992 (Cth.) , and the Space  Activities Amendment (Launches and Returns) 2018 .

Space Law Services

Surprise! Space law is a thing. Almost every nation features complex regulation around near-space and outer space, generally deriving from international treaties such as the Outer Space Treaty.

While space is becoming more accessible for the every day person to take advantage of, meeting the requirements of local and international regulation is onerous and frequently the largest blockade for commercial space ventures taking off.

We challenge engineers and lawyers to join forces to develop automated legal services that reduce the friction experienced by novel space-related teams, while helping government protect their interests when ratifying space-related law.

HINT: Look into the Space Activities Act 1998 (Cth.), Defence Trade Controls Act 2012 (Cth.), Radiocommunication Act 1992 (Cth.), and the Space Activities Amendment (Launches and Returns) 2018.

  Augmented Reality for Design and Engineering   Many people remember just how much a flop the Google Glass was when it was first released. Recently, however, people are surprised to hear that it’s made a huge come back - but rather than being a consumer product, it’s become a useful tool deeper in the supply chain - helping workers from designers, engineers, technicians and factory workers perform the tasks of their jobs better in many ways.  This challenge is to use augmented reality to improve the aerospace hardware design and build process. Help engineers gain a new perspective on the structures they’re designing, help technicians instantly visualise exactly how tight that next bolt should be wound, and help new employees and end consumers receive immersive and effective training with new equipment before engaging with the real thing.

Augmented Reality for Design and Engineering

Many people remember just how much a flop the Google Glass was when it was first released. Recently, however, people are surprised to hear that it’s made a huge come back - but rather than being a consumer product, it’s become a useful tool deeper in the supply chain - helping workers from designers, engineers, technicians and factory workers perform the tasks of their jobs better in many ways.

This challenge is to use augmented reality to improve the aerospace hardware design and build process. Help engineers gain a new perspective on the structures they’re designing, help technicians instantly visualise exactly how tight that next bolt should be wound, and help new employees and end consumers receive immersive and effective training with new equipment before engaging with the real thing.

  3D Printing with Metal for Dummies   3D printing is becoming more and more ubiquitous as technology behind plastic based printers becomes cheaper and more powerful. New features such as heated print beds and smart algorithms have meant that for most plastic printers, making a design enter the physical world is as simple as the push of a button.  This is an amazing development since it’s now trivial to create designs that were, until recently, impossible to manufacture, meaning we can now help much better hardware assemblies come to life with significantly less complexity.  3D printing metal structures, such as rocket or jet engines, is still difficult though, and a lot of manual preparation is needed before a CAD model can be sent to a metal printer. Issues such as warping, high surface roughness, porosity, and fatigue strength need to be considered.  Design a tool to help engineers prepare 3D models for metal 3D printing.

3D Printing with Metal for Dummies

3D printing is becoming more and more ubiquitous as technology behind plastic based printers becomes cheaper and more powerful. New features such as heated print beds and smart algorithms have meant that for most plastic printers, making a design enter the physical world is as simple as the push of a button.

This is an amazing development since it’s now trivial to create designs that were, until recently, impossible to manufacture, meaning we can now help much better hardware assemblies come to life with significantly less complexity.

3D printing metal structures, such as rocket or jet engines, is still difficult though, and a lot of manual preparation is needed before a CAD model can be sent to a metal printer. Issues such as warping, high surface roughness, porosity, and fatigue strength need to be considered.

Design a tool to help engineers prepare 3D models for metal 3D printing.

Space Infrastructure

Space infrastructure is what most people think of when they think about space technology: rockets and satellites. But this category goes so much further, especially today when even the average person has the ability to access space and for less than the cost of a fast food franchise they can start their own space program.

Space infrastructure is what enables us to leverage the unique properties of space - whether orbital space around earth or outer space far away from our home planet - for the benefit of humanity. Satellites enable us to monitor and learn about our planet from a unique perspective giving us insights like never before. New upstream technologies and advances mean we’re now on the verge of new classes of spacecraft that can efficiently navigate orbital space and outer space much better than a traditional chemical fueled rocket, and advances in robotic automation mean the next generations of extraterrestrial vehicles will be able to be much more powerful and useful for commercial purposes.

  Alternative Propulsion Systems   Chemical propulsion systems have been the only viable way for us to escape the Earth’s gravity, to reach orbit, and beyond. Chemical based rocket engines are very inefficient though. The larger they are, the more fuel they need. In fact, a large portion of their mass is additional fuel needed to account for the additional fuel being held!  Today, with more and more launch options for getting into orbit, we’re starting to see opportunities that necessitate much more efficient options for travelling once in orbit. Technologies such as solar sails, laser based propulsion, and electric propulsion systems are not useful for getting from the surface of the Earth into orbit, but they are fantastic options for moving between orbits or even to distant planets, moons, and asteroids.  Space tugs using such technology may provide a commercial opportunity to enable in-space services, such as maintaining old satellites, recycling or cleaning up orbital junk, and there are arguments to be made they provide a better option for travelling from earth orbit to the Moon or Mars as opposed to large rockets attempting to take the entire trip.  Develop a plan for integrating existing and emerging technologies that could result in a commercially viable space tug business today.

Alternative Propulsion Systems

Chemical propulsion systems have been the only viable way for us to escape the Earth’s gravity, to reach orbit, and beyond. Chemical based rocket engines are very inefficient though. The larger they are, the more fuel they need. In fact, a large portion of their mass is additional fuel needed to account for the additional fuel being held!

Today, with more and more launch options for getting into orbit, we’re starting to see opportunities that necessitate much more efficient options for travelling once in orbit. Technologies such as solar sails, laser based propulsion, and electric propulsion systems are not useful for getting from the surface of the Earth into orbit, but they are fantastic options for moving between orbits or even to distant planets, moons, and asteroids.

Space tugs using such technology may provide a commercial opportunity to enable in-space services, such as maintaining old satellites, recycling or cleaning up orbital junk, and there are arguments to be made they provide a better option for travelling from earth orbit to the Moon or Mars as opposed to large rockets attempting to take the entire trip.

Develop a plan for integrating existing and emerging technologies that could result in a commercially viable space tug business today.

  Trash or Treasure?   Would you purchase a brand new smartphone if it had no charging port, and once the battery depleted for the first time your expensive device was considered junk? Today, large satellites need to be sent into space with all the fuel they need to last their desired lifetimes, which could mean half of the satellite’s launch mass is entirely fuel. When these satellites reach their end of life, generally the hardware is still functional.  Today there are 4857 satellites in orbit, but only 1980 are active. Imagine how much less space junk Earth would have if we recycled old satellites, not to mention the money saved by not needing to launch more mass into orbit!  This challenge asks participants to consider emerging space industries, including establishing orbital refueling points, satellite maintenance space tugs, and the creation of a second hand marketplace for existing space assets and infrastructure.  Develop a model for integrating new and emerging technologies to enable the above, and include a simple market analysis describing the viability of your solution.

Trash or Treasure?

Would you purchase a brand new smartphone if it had no charging port, and once the battery depleted for the first time your expensive device was considered junk? Today, large satellites need to be sent into space with all the fuel they need to last their desired lifetimes, which could mean half of the satellite’s launch mass is entirely fuel. When these satellites reach their end of life, generally the hardware is still functional.

Today there are 4857 satellites in orbit, but only 1980 are active. Imagine how much less space junk Earth would have if we recycled old satellites, not to mention the money saved by not needing to launch more mass into orbit!

This challenge asks participants to consider emerging space industries, including establishing orbital refueling points, satellite maintenance space tugs, and the creation of a second hand marketplace for existing space assets and infrastructure.

Develop a model for integrating new and emerging technologies to enable the above, and include a simple market analysis describing the viability of your solution.

  Extraterrestrial Architecture   Astronauts on board the International Space Station live in orbit for up to 6 months at a time. For anyone who has seen images of the station, I’m sure you’d agree that it’s a long way off for anyone being able to stick a ‘Home Sweet Home’ sign anywhere.  As the cis-lunar economy evolves and we begin to send humans to Mars, we need to shift our design choices from purely functional to human centered design. A human landing on Mars should expect to spend the rest of their life in the confined base, with a limited number of people to talk to that they may come to dislike. Children born there won’t have experienced standing outside to breath fresh air with sunlight shining on their face. Unlike the astronaut selection processes today, we can’t select the personalities of the children.  Space bases beyond orbit need to be built with consideration of the psychological, as well as physical, impacts of humans living on Mars.  Design and conduct a financial analysis for a modular space base architecture considering the above. Ensure the design takes steps to minimise transportation volume, ensure safety and reliability, includes the essential life support mechanisms, etc.

Extraterrestrial Architecture

Astronauts on board the International Space Station live in orbit for up to 6 months at a time. For anyone who has seen images of the station, I’m sure you’d agree that it’s a long way off for anyone being able to stick a ‘Home Sweet Home’ sign anywhere.

As the cis-lunar economy evolves and we begin to send humans to Mars, we need to shift our design choices from purely functional to human centered design. A human landing on Mars should expect to spend the rest of their life in the confined base, with a limited number of people to talk to that they may come to dislike. Children born there won’t have experienced standing outside to breath fresh air with sunlight shining on their face. Unlike the astronaut selection processes today, we can’t select the personalities of the children.

Space bases beyond orbit need to be built with consideration of the psychological, as well as physical, impacts of humans living on Mars.

Design and conduct a financial analysis for a modular space base architecture considering the above. Ensure the design takes steps to minimise transportation volume, ensure safety and reliability, includes the essential life support mechanisms, etc.

  SaaS - Satellites as a Service   Once upon a time computers were considered something only the most powerful governments would have access to. Today, computers and smart devices are ubiquitous, and ‘cloud’ infrastructure has revolutionised our ability to personally leverage and scale software service applications without needing to worry about the underlying hardware infrastructure.  Just as cloud infrastructure for computing has different levels - Infrastructure-as-a-Service, Platform-as-a-Service, and Software-as-a-Service - it may be that space based infrastructure will undergo a similar shift as more individuals and groups find new ways to leverage space assets.  This challenge asks you to review the business case for creating the IaaS/PaaS/SaaS of satellites, and to design the fundamental system architecture for such satellites.  For example, a software-defined satellite may make it viable for customers to purchase 100 orbits of a particular satellite with a capability to monitor crops using hyper-spectral imagery in greater resolution than general earth observation providers. By uploading code for on-board processing of the data, the customer may be able to minimise their bandwidth usage to obtain just the information they need.

SaaS - Satellites as a Service

Once upon a time computers were considered something only the most powerful governments would have access to. Today, computers and smart devices are ubiquitous, and ‘cloud’ infrastructure has revolutionised our ability to personally leverage and scale software service applications without needing to worry about the underlying hardware infrastructure.

Just as cloud infrastructure for computing has different levels - Infrastructure-as-a-Service, Platform-as-a-Service, and Software-as-a-Service - it may be that space based infrastructure will undergo a similar shift as more individuals and groups find new ways to leverage space assets.

This challenge asks you to review the business case for creating the IaaS/PaaS/SaaS of satellites, and to design the fundamental system architecture for such satellites.

For example, a software-defined satellite may make it viable for customers to purchase 100 orbits of a particular satellite with a capability to monitor crops using hyper-spectral imagery in greater resolution than general earth observation providers. By uploading code for on-board processing of the data, the customer may be able to minimise their bandwidth usage to obtain just the information they need.

  3D Printed Nanosatellite Antenna   With the advancements of smart phone technology and increasing launches into Earth orbit, the ability for the average person to build and deploy powerful but cheap small satellites into orbit has led to a new revolution in humanities utilisation of space.  As satellites are getting smaller, nanosatellites, which have traditionally been relatively unsophisticated compared to their larger counterparts, can benefit from advancements in design and manufacturing.  This challenge asks participants to design an efficient and lightweight 3D printed antenna for nanosatellites. Review whether you can design an antenna that would improve a satellite operator’s telecommunications link, power and mass budgets, and whether your solution would result in any additional value downstream.

3D Printed Nanosatellite Antenna

With the advancements of smart phone technology and increasing launches into Earth orbit, the ability for the average person to build and deploy powerful but cheap small satellites into orbit has led to a new revolution in humanities utilisation of space.

As satellites are getting smaller, nanosatellites, which have traditionally been relatively unsophisticated compared to their larger counterparts, can benefit from advancements in design and manufacturing.

This challenge asks participants to design an efficient and lightweight 3D printed antenna for nanosatellites. Review whether you can design an antenna that would improve a satellite operator’s telecommunications link, power and mass budgets, and whether your solution would result in any additional value downstream.

  Earth On Demand   Satellites orbiting the earth don’t have a constant connection with the Earth, and they may only be in contact 10% of the time. In fact, a satellite operator, such as an academic institution, might only have a single ground station to communicate with their satellite.  Determine the viability of establishing an international network of ground stations, providing satellite operators the ability to communicate with their satellites and constellations orbiting the planet. What would different segments of satellite operators be willing to pay to have an enhanced ability to communicate with their satellites without the complexity of maintaining their own ground segment?  Consider the different markets of telecommunications satellites, earth observation satellites, systems using different orbits such as LEO versus GEO, and the emergence of less sophisticated satellite operators such as startups and academic groups.

Earth On Demand

Satellites orbiting the earth don’t have a constant connection with the Earth, and they may only be in contact 10% of the time. In fact, a satellite operator, such as an academic institution, might only have a single ground station to communicate with their satellite.

Determine the viability of establishing an international network of ground stations, providing satellite operators the ability to communicate with their satellites and constellations orbiting the planet. What would different segments of satellite operators be willing to pay to have an enhanced ability to communicate with their satellites without the complexity of maintaining their own ground segment?

Consider the different markets of telecommunications satellites, earth observation satellites, systems using different orbits such as LEO versus GEO, and the emergence of less sophisticated satellite operators such as startups and academic groups.

Downstream Space Technology

This is where things get more relatable for the average consumer. Today, there is no such thing as the singular space industry. Space infrastructure already underpins every corner of our society and economy today. Whether on earth or in outer space, many industries benefit from space infrastructure. This makes a lot of sense when you compare the resources available to us both within the confines of our Pale Blue Dot and those outside - we are already in space.

This category includes space applications that address problems in areas such as mining, agriculture, defence, logistics, manufacturing, education, health and medicine, and much more.

  Pharmaceutical Manufacturing in Space   With the emergence of the commercial space station market, it is becoming increasingly possible to use space for new industries such as tourism, and even medicine.  Space, and micro-gravity in particular, provides unique conditions that could lead to new and improved medicines. Improving the 3D structure of protein crystals through growth in space can have a positive impact on drug delivery, manufacturing and storage.  Develop a prototype for an automated space based drug nano-factory, leveraging ‘space-in-space’ service providers such as Nanoracks or Airbus’ Bartolomeo platform.

Pharmaceutical Manufacturing in Space

With the emergence of the commercial space station market, it is becoming increasingly possible to use space for new industries such as tourism, and even medicine.

Space, and micro-gravity in particular, provides unique conditions that could lead to new and improved medicines. Improving the 3D structure of protein crystals through growth in space can have a positive impact on drug delivery, manufacturing and storage.

Develop a prototype for an automated space based drug nano-factory, leveraging ‘space-in-space’ service providers such as Nanoracks or Airbus’ Bartolomeo platform.

  In Space Farming   It’s one thing to land humans on Mars. It’s another to create a sustained presence.  When humanity has a permanent extraterrestrial settlement that isn’t in Low Earth Orbit, one of the most valuable innovations we will need is a way to grow or manufacture food with good nutrition.  This may mean learning to grow vegetables in micro-gravity or by creating large scale terrariums with material shipped from earth, or it may mean getting creative. Is it possible to grow potatoes in Martian soil? What would an organisation be willing to pay if it became possible to create humankind’s first extraterrestrial agricultural industry, where food would be fresh and no longer needs to be lifted into LEO at massive expense, before a long interplanetary trip?

In Space Farming

It’s one thing to land humans on Mars. It’s another to create a sustained presence.

When humanity has a permanent extraterrestrial settlement that isn’t in Low Earth Orbit, one of the most valuable innovations we will need is a way to grow or manufacture food with good nutrition.

This may mean learning to grow vegetables in micro-gravity or by creating large scale terrariums with material shipped from earth, or it may mean getting creative. Is it possible to grow potatoes in Martian soil? What would an organisation be willing to pay if it became possible to create humankind’s first extraterrestrial agricultural industry, where food would be fresh and no longer needs to be lifted into LEO at massive expense, before a long interplanetary trip?

  Drones on Mars   On earth, it has become trivial to design and build powerful multicopters and unmanned aerial vehicles that can be fitted with a variety of powerful sensors. With a low density atmosphere on Mars, would it be possible to build a low--atmospheric drone that is capable of conducting prospecting missions on Mars much more rapidly than NASA’s current Mars rover is able to?  Design a low atmospheric drone for Mars that is capable of autonomous prospecting of water and ice on Mars, while collecting data that could indicate a useful location for mining operations that would turn water into elements and chemicals such as oxygen for sustaining human settlements, and hydrogen or methane for fueling rockets.

Drones on Mars

On earth, it has become trivial to design and build powerful multicopters and unmanned aerial vehicles that can be fitted with a variety of powerful sensors. With a low density atmosphere on Mars, would it be possible to build a low--atmospheric drone that is capable of conducting prospecting missions on Mars much more rapidly than NASA’s current Mars rover is able to?

Design a low atmospheric drone for Mars that is capable of autonomous prospecting of water and ice on Mars, while collecting data that could indicate a useful location for mining operations that would turn water into elements and chemicals such as oxygen for sustaining human settlements, and hydrogen or methane for fueling rockets.

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The Place For Space


The Place For Space


Public Events

Throughout the weekend, alongside the hackathon, we are inviting the public into the Victorian Innovation Hub to join our celebration of space in Melbourne. Below are some of the stellar events we’re hosting!

Meet The Speakers

 
 
 

Experience Outer Space with Virtual Reality

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Opaque Space - Earthlight

Have you ever dreamed of being and astronaut and travelling into space? The Melbourne-based virtual reality wizards at Opaque Space have been working with NASA to develop realistic training simulators for astronauts - and now you have the chance to have your own extra terrestrial experience!

Sydney Morning Herald - Aussie team to work with NASA on virtual space station

Watch the Earthlight VR trailer here

* Earthlight will be present on Saturday only *

 

Melbourne Space Industry Mixer

The Australian space industry is heating up and after months of various workshops on the future of Australia's space capability, industries, and related professions, we're thrilled to host to the second Melbourne Space Industry Mixer.

From aerospace, academia, government, consulting and beyond, we're gathering professionals from the wider space ecosystem to come together to enjoy a night of light drinks and canapés (and fantastic company) at the new Victorian Innovation Hub, including a chance to mingle with Australia's next generation of space industry innovators.

If you are a space-related professional, academic researcher, or government representative, we hope to see you there!

When: 6:30 PM - 10 PM, Saturday 20th October
Where: Victorian Innovation Hub, 710 Collins Street, Docklands, Victoria, 3008

 

Weekend Timetable

The hackathon/bootcamp is the primary event of the weekend. The challenges will begin at 9:00 am on Saturday, with side events, competitions and workshops occurring throughout the weekend. Lab-14 will close at 10:00 pm on Saturday, but the fun will continue at 9:00 am on Sunday morning! Check out the draft schedule below for more detail.

Sunday 21st October, 2018

09:00 Doors open
10:00  Pitching Workshop - Grant Downie and Troy McCann
11:00 Fireside Chat with NASA Astronaut Greg H. Johnson
13:00 Lunch for hackathon participants
15:00 Hackathon deadline, begin uploading projects
Tech check for presentations
15:45  Pitch presentations
16:45  Awards/Closing Remarks
17:00  Celebration/After Party, heading to the Pub

Items in italics are publicly accessible events and are optional for hackathon participants.

Saturday 20th October, 2018

09:00  Registration and Doors Open
09:30
Opening address and Ice Breaker Games
10:00  Space Tech Round-table Discussions
11:00   The Science of Branding New Industries - Lauren Crystal
12:00   Creative Problem Solving - Tristonne Forbes
13:30   Inspiration and the New Space Hub - John Tucker
Lunch for hackathon participants
14:30  Ethical Space Technology - Dr Evie Kendall
17:00  Dinner for hackathon participants
Doors close for general public
18:30 Melbourne Space Industry Mixer Begins
19:00
The Australis OSCAR 5 Story - Richard Tonkin
21:59  Venue closes

 

The Space for Space: Victorian Innovation Hub

NASA Space Apps, the T Minus Bootcamp and the above attractions - combining to form the Gemini Melbourne mini space festival - will be hosted at the brand new Victorian Innovation Hub, the refurbished Goods Shed North, which brings together leading startups across a range of sectors including medtech, agtech, fintech and cyber security.

Address: 710 Collins Street, Docklands, VIC